To Fly or Not To Fly (the Confederate Flag)



Recently, I had an unpleasant debate with a friend of a friend about the Confederate flag and its usage. My friend had an ideological take on the subject which I didn’t find to be practical. Basically, his view was that flags are just woven material with patterns and designs, and don’t mean anything. It’s just that because we are all CRAZY that we project meaning onto these inanimate objects we call flags, and use them as an excuse to display emotions improperly. Therefore, it was okay for the state of South Carolina to sanction and fly the Confederate flag, as it would have been for it to fly any flag on its public grounds, or to have had no flag at all. For him it was just a First Amendment issue marked by relativism.

My friend’s friend agreed, but he took it a bit further. He stated that the American Flag was just as offensive as the Confederate Flag because white men owning slaves founded the United States. Along with slavery, the American Flag flew full mast over segregation of African Americans, internment of Japanese Americans, and worst of all, a genocide of Native Americans. But really he was playing Devil’s Advocate, because the Confederate flag flying on state grounds was just fine by him as it represents southern heritage to many. He even posted a link to a poll which showed that, prior to the Charleston massacre, only 61% of blacks in South Carolina wanted the Confederate flag to come down, and 27% of black South Carolinians wanted to keep it up! I couldn’t have imagined that that many blacks didn’t have a problem with the Confederate flag. My take? More South Carolinians, black and white alike, have since come to their senses. That damned flag is now down.

The argument against the flag is apparent and pretty straightforward. The Confederates were domestic terrorists, traitors, and were willing to die to treat black people like cattle, and worse. To defend the Confederate flag today as a symbol of southern heritage is as dishonorable as it would be for Germans to defend the swastika flag as a symbol of their heritage. I acknowledge that there are aspects of the US Civil War and Germany in World War 2 that do not parallel each other, but the principle is the same. On human rights issues and on territorial claims, both, the Confederacy and Nazi Germany, were in the wrong and deserved to lose.

The Americans were traitors and terrorists to the British, but on a continent apart and against an abusive king who sought to expand a colonial empire of oppression. As victors over the British, however, we proved our character to be no better than theirs during the American Indian wars. Our flag should not be flown over American Indian reservations … but if – for all of America’s crimes – the American flag should be brought down throughout the rest of the country, then we might as well wish to renounce our citizenship and leave. 

The truth on this issue of the Confederacy, the Union it fought, and of its flag, was summed up best by yet another participant in the debate I was in, as follows:

“The Confederados of Brazil are using the flag to represent their heritage. Granted, they are Brazilians now even if their ancestors were American confederates. The battle flag is not seen as racist in Brazil but is seen as the flag of a distinct ethnic group. So I can agree, these rags are nothing more than symbols that have different meanings to different people.

When I lived in South Korea, I saw swastikas on Buddhist temples. It was kind of strange for me, because I had never seen a swastika in that context. The swastika is used in India and other parts of Asia and has no connection to Nazi Germany. Surely, the Native Americans who used swastikas in designs on pottery and woven cloths weren’t Nazi’s.

What bothers me about the battle flag isn’t that some use it to mark their heritage or that others malign the flag because of its links to slavery. Rather, what bothers me is the narrative behind the flag more than its symbolism. For example: To hear some southerners tell it… “The south just wanted to preserve a way of life that was gentile and hospitable where the sun shined upon the beautiful plantation fields where slaves worked eagerly to please their masters. Slaves were treated kindly and were better off under slavery than free blacks in the North who were starving in the streets. It was not until the Northern invaded us that we went to war to defend our way of life.” This revisionist viewpoint is utter nonsense.

On the other side, the narrative of Northerners as benevolent non-racists who freed the black man from the shackles of their white southern oppressors is equally as nonsensical. I’ve seen movies/documentaries where Lincoln is portrayed as this enlightened gentleman who holds a black child on his lap and promises to free their people. Lincoln only cared about preserving the union with or without slavery. Neither of the above narratives is truthful or intellectually honest.

If this country ever wants to move past this schism, then we have to appreciate the history of how we got to where we are today. This includes teaching the good, the bad, and the very ugly parts of our history. To me what is more dangerous than a rag hanging from a pole is historical revisionism.”

Indirectly related, he added:

“All facets of history should be taught. I’m frankly quite irritated at the Texas School Board due to their decision that the KKK and Jim Crow laws need not be mentioned in history books any longer. Several years ago, the same school board axed Thomas Jefferson as a great political thinker because of his views on the separation of church and state.”

Sounds like some are still fighting the Union!

Bailey, Isaac J. (July 1, 2015). I’m a Black Southerner Who’s Seen Racism All My Life. Why Do I Stay Silent? Politico
Brown, Emma (July 5, 2015). Texas officials: Schools should teach that slavery was ‘side issue’ to Civil War Washington Post
Libresco, Leah (June 22, 2015). Before Charleston, Not Many People Wanted To Take Down The Confederate Flag Five Thirty Eight
Civil War Trust. (2014) 10 Facts About the Emancipation Proclamation
Wikipedia. American Civil War
The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln edited by Roy P. Basler, Volume III, “Lincoln-Douglas Debate at Galesburg” (October 7, 1858), p. 226.
The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln edited by Roy P. Basler, Volume V, “Letter to Horace Greeley” (August 22, 1862), p. 388.

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Approaching Reality

On Bernie Sanders



http://myrivercityblues.com/2015/07/06/bernie-sanders-is-not-eugene-mccarthy-if-anything-hes-an-electable-barry-goldwater/



Excellent, excellent write up on the Bernie Sanders lowdown. This guy just did my work for me, and he’s done it better than I ever could.

The point is that Bernie Sanders is a movement candidate, which is rare in American politics; but when political movements do happen, they are powerful and, indeed, revolutionary. Sanders is far from a protest candidate Eugene McCarthy, and he’s not just another Howard Dean either. A lot has changed even since 2004, and Bernie Sanders is not a standard cult of personality candidate.

Barry Goldwater is really the political model that is happening here, just on the Democratic side. Conservatives loved Goldwater because he defined what conservatives wanted in their politics: someone who was honest, and someone who would fight for their interests. It was not about Goldwater personally. Likewise with Bernie.



Sanders & Goldwater

How To Go About Understanding Conspiracy in the Assassination of JFK


Conspiracy to Assassinate JFK, 101


Researching the assassination can be a monolithic undertaking and a confusing mess, especially for a beginner. The best way to initiate oneself into the study of the conspiracy is to pick one suspect – LBJ, the CIA, the Pentagon, Hoover, Secret Service – and read up on them. I don’t reccommend focusing on the Mafia or Cuban Exiles because they are not of the government. The source of this plot is rooted in the federal government, and that’s what’s of greatest significance. A criminal organization (the mob) and a militant organization (the anti-Castro fighters) were involved, but this was a coup d’état – the overthrow of our government by our government – and to this day, the government continues to cover up this act of treason as intensely as they did 50 years ago.

How This Came To Be


A phenomena existed where severe hatred towards JFK came from all the factions of power in government. In the Executive branch it was LBJ. It was the Allen Dulles loyalists in the CIA. In the Pentagon it was Curtis LeMay, among others. In the Secret Service the hatred for JFK among agents was pervasive and open. In the State Dept, the malfeasance of Henry Cabot Lodge suggests hatred. In the FBI there was J. Edgar Hoover and Clyde Tolson. Additionally, the government had two dangerous clients – the mafia, and Cuban Exile militants – thanks to their deranged campaign to take Cuba back from Castro. They too hated Kennedy.

Why It Came To This


As horror after horror happened at the hand of JFK (as the national security establishment saw it) – the betrayal at the Bay of Pigs, a pitiful sliver of aid to South Vietnam, what would result in the Cuban Missile Crisis and its outcome, a  rapprochement with Cuba on the horizon, an impending withdrawal from South Vietnam – alliances were formed among those who saw Kennedy’s elimination as a necessity.

Exploiting the Public Trust


The conspirators knew that the notion of all these different parties and individuals being involved was something the masses would scoff at. Americans had a profound trust in their government at the time, and it was inconceivable then that so many psychopaths were in charge of it. To this day, the prospect of the government gunning down Kennedy, a popular US President, is, to many, just too wild and outrageous a belief to be open minded about. Indeed, many mainstream personalities and anonymous individuals alike scorn the idea of conspiracy. They are hostile towards, and ridicule, those who believe in – not just the JFK conspiracy, but – almost any conspiracy. This is really, really dumb, but more on that later.


Onion-on-JFK


“Actually, there were probably dozens of plots to kill Kennedy, because everybody hated Kennedy but the public.” ~ Saint John Hunt 

Introduction to a Sinister Reality


The United States became a Federal Republic upon ratification of the Constitution in 1789, and following passage of the 17th Amendment in 1913 it became a representative democracy as well. All this came to an end on November 22nd 1963, when our elected President was overthrown in a brutal Coup d’État. Since then we’ve come to live under something much different.

Conspiracy in the assassination of John F. Kennedy is not a matter of theory. It is not mere opinion or a guess that a conspiracy materialized from up on high. The evidence is there – both hard and soft – and in the case of the libel suit Liberty Lobby, the CIA’s complicity was proven in a court of law. The general public is unaware of all this, and to what extent they are aware of facts which greatly undermine the official version, they are often in denial. The public can think what it wants but they are lied to everyday by the government. Indeed, it takes a special amount of brainwashing to believe that our government tells us the truth on nearly anything at all. In other countries it is a given that we are corrupt beyond belief. Ask people in the countries we call our allies what they think, and I guarantee you they will tell you that the US government is a lying sack of shit.

The core of the US’s dysfunction stems from JFK’s death. It is the root of the corruption that reeks today. To understand the dynamics of the criminal world in which our government does its business, the JFK assassination must be understood and confronted. For the intelligence community the assassination was a successful operation that led to their founding – “Autonomous Central Intelligence Agency, Est. 1963”. The agency has worked the same way since, as it is predicated on this rich legacy of a tried and true formula implemented at the highest levels.

The best way to begin studying the assassination is to first gain familiarity with Kennedy’s presidency – specifically his foreign policy record. To that end, this link is my recommended starting point.  

 
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 President John F. Kennedy with senior CIA officials in 1961